Project Otaku Powerlevelling: Part 15

Part fifteen, coming your way.


Melty Lancer

Admittedly, when you talk to me sometimes, I can come off like a chauvinist. It's not *all* the time, but I'm willing to cop to it, primarily because it's mostly just jokes. When I feel like being funny, I do NOT pull punches, and sometimes people can mistake that for my being a sexist jerk.

But jokes are exactly that--jokes. I love strong women, both in real life and fiction, and some series succeed or fail based on whether I think they pass the test of them actually *being* strong. (Same with the guys. Weakness does not entertain me.)

This is how Melty Lancer made it on this list. I love shows set in space to begin with, but noticing the all-female cast of "special forces" police, I kinda figured there would be some badassery going on.

This, is what I get for thinking. Initially, this six episode OVA displayed a group of characters that were just awesome as I wanted them to be...for about five minutes, and then for the rest of the show, they found themselves immediately and repeatedly upstaged by...well...everyone. Bad guys. Good guys. Random characters.

It would not have been too terrible, had they not been described as an S-Class team capable of handling anything once united. My expectations were set high, only to have them crash around me in their first fight scene, in which the villain is defeated through unforeseen variables rather than the team's actual abilities.

The story's plot itself is rather empty--so much so that I barely remember what it was about, just that it wandered aimlessly for most of the series before finally tying things up in the final two episodes.

I was hoping for Gunsmith Cats in space, with this one. But what I got was Kiddy Girl-and with even more protagonists. Disappointing. I need to watch Nanoha (or Kiddy Grade) to remind myself of the bad-ass female heroes in anime.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Why Aren't You Reading Superwoman?

Making the Case for tri-ace: The Last Hope of Integrity and Faithlessness